Information about Western Hemisphere Hemisferio Occidental
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Appendix 8. Model Survey Forms

Author(s):
Eduardo Valdivia-Velarde, and Tamara Razin
Published Date:
December 2014
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Table A8.1Summary of the Model Survey Forms
Forms number and titleScope and purposeOther comments
1. Exploratory SurveyThis form collects information on the type and size of balance of payments and IIP activity undertaken by enterprise groups. It provides information for maintaining and developing a balance of payments and IIP company register.This form may be regarded as a benchmark collection form. It uses mark boxes to encourage a quick response. It may be modified to establish an ITRS register.
2. Company Register FormThis form records details of enterprise groups and the type and size of their balance of payments and IIP activity. It provides data essential for the balance of payments and IIP collection designs and maintenance.This is an office form.
3-1. ITRS—Payments and ReceiptsThis form collects single transactions reported to the banking system by banks’ clients or by banks on behalf of their clients.
3-2. ITRS—Imports and ExportsThis form shows how an ITRS could be used to capture data on goods transactions.It is not recommended to compile goods statistics based on ITRS due to limitations described in Chapter 11.
3-3. ITRS—CompaniesThis form is for FDR reporters and covers transactions passing through company foreign currency accounts at domestic banks, bank accounts at nonresident banks, noncash transactions, and external asset and liability positions and for PDR reporters. It includes transactions passing through company bank accounts at nonresident banks, including positions.
3-4. ITRS—BanksThis form collects details of banks’ positions.
3-5. ITRS—Bank’s Records of TransactionsThis form collects details of banks’ flows.
Annex to Forms 3-1- 3-5 for ITRS—ClassificationsThe annex presents sample list of transaction and other codes used in ITRS.
4. GoodsThe form collects across-the-board data and selected data on exports and imports of goods and the receipts and payments for repairs and manufacturing services.The form illustrates methods for collecting various data—including manufacturing services and repairs—on goods.
5. Goods for MerchantingThis form collects data required for recording merchanting transactions in the balance of payments. Data should be collected on a gross basis, by commodity, and by partner economy, wherever possible.
6. International Trade in ServicesThe form collects data on services not covered by forms 7–13 and 21–22 for compilation of various services items.Separate forms could be created to collect information on specific aspects of services (for example, provision of financial services).
7. Manufacturing ServicesThis form contains a sample questionnaire on manufacturing services on physical inputs owned by others.
8. Resident Transport OperatorsThe form collects data on resident transport operator earnings and expenses for compilation of transportation and certain goods items.The form could be tailored for different modes of transport. Several more specialized forms could be created from the model form.
9. Transactions with Nonresident Transport OperatorsThe form collects, from residents, data on nonresident transport operators’ earnings and expenses for compilation of transportation and certain goods items.The form could be tailored for different modes of transport. Several more specialized forms could be created from the model form.
10. International TravelThe form collects data on the means used to pay for travel and related services for compilation of the travel item.Several specialized forms could be created from this form.
11. Construction ServicesThis form collects information on construction abroad, construction in the compiling economy, as well as data on both short-term and long-term construction projects.
12. International Insurance TransactionsThe form collects information on the insurance and reinsurance activities of resident companies. The data are used in the compilation of services, current and capital transfers, and the IIP.The form illustrates methods for collecting various data specifically associated with the insurance industry.
13. International Pension ServicesThe form collects information on the pension activities of resident pension funds. The data are used in the compilation of services, current transfers, financial transactions, and the IIP.The form illustrates methods for collecting various data specifically associated with the operations of pension funds.
14. Foreign Embassies and International InstitutionsThe form collects data on wages and salaries paid to local workers, other embassy expenditures, foreign aid, and official finance. These data are used to compile compensation of employee, government services, current transfer, financial account, IIP, and investment income items.While the reporters to this form, who will be nonresidents, cannot be compelled to complete it, a number of countries have successfully collected information by using forms similar to the model form.
15. Private Aid and Charitable OrganizationsThe form collects data on the income, compensation of employees, and current and capital transfers of private aid and other charitable organizations.The form illustrates methods for collecting various data specifically associated with the operations of private aid and charitable organizations, including their relationship with nonresident entities.
16. Current Transfers, Grants, and Technical AssistanceThis form collects information on current transfers, grants, and technical assistance. Part A of the form seeks information on transfers in cash and in kind received by the government and the private sector, including nongovernment organizations (NGO). Part B of the form pertains to technical assistance of project work / staffed missions received by the economy.The information can be used for the compilation of current transfers in the secondary income account and capital transfers in the capital account.
17. Financial Claims on and Liabilities to NonresidentsThe form collects data on financial flows, positions, reconciliation items, income, certain financial services, and withholding taxes. The data are used to compile financial account, IIP, investment income, financial services, and current transfer items.In practice, several forms may be created from this form, or more simplified versions of the form could be developed. An example, associated specifically with foreign direct investment, is provided as form 18.
18. Foreign Direct InvestmentThe form collects data specifically on foreign direct investment items of form 17.This form is a narrower version of form 17, collecting data specifically on foreign direct investment.
19. International SecuritiesThis form collects data on financial transactions, positions, income, financial services, and withholding taxes associated with international securities from financial intermediaries. The data are used to compile financial account, IIP, investment income, financial services, and current transfer items.The form can be used in either an enterprise survey or an ITRS. The form is based on the assumption that comprehensive data are available from a single source; when this is not the case, the form should be modified. For enterprise surveys, the compiler should ensure that the delineation of reporting between form 17 (or its equivalent) and form 19 is clear and that double counting is avoided.
20. Holdings of and Transactions in Financial Derivatives Contracts with NonresidentsThis form collects collect information on holdings of and transactions in financial derivatives contracts with nonresidents.The data are collected by types of derivative instruments (options, futures and forwards, and swaps). The reporting instructions explain how the forms are to be accomplished.
21. Travel: Returning ResidentsThe form collects data from returning residents on their expenditure on goods and services and on income and other amounts received while abroad. The data are used mainly to compile travel and compensation of employee items.The model form is designed to be completed by returning residents shortly after they arrive back in the compiling economy. Alternatively, the questions could be included in regular household surveys for completion sometime after returning.
22. Travel: Departing NonresidentsThe form collects data from nonresidents departing the economy on their expenditure on goods and services and on income and other amounts received while in the compiling economy. The data are used mainly to compile travel and compensation of employee items.The model form is designed to be completed by departing nonresidents shortly before they depart from the compiling economy. Alternatively, the form could be used as the basis for an interview survey of these nonresidents.
23. International Transactions and Positions of HouseholdsThis form requests data that would be of specific interest for households.

Instructions for Form 2—Company Register Form

The company register form is used to record information about members (companies) of the population.

The information is subsequently used to conduct balance of payments and IIP surveys.

In part A, the reference number, the name of the top company in the group, and the address; the name and title of the contact officer in the company (e.g., the person who completed the exploratory form or the person who completes other collection forms); and the contact’s telephone and facsimile numbers are recorded.

In part B, information on the enterprise group is entered. This section allows for both descriptive coding and an alphanumeric code. The type of information that may be stored here includes:

Type of Unit

This section shows whether the statistical unit is:

  • 1. A single company unit
  • 2. A multi enterprise group
  • 3. A split enterprise group—that is, one that has been split according to sector.

Sector

  • 1. General government
  • 2. Central bank
  • 3. Other deposit-taking corporation
  • 4. Other financial corporation
    • 4a. Money market fund (MMF)
    • 4b. Non-MMF investment fund
    • 4c. Other financial intermediary (except insurance corporations and pension funds)
    • 4d. Financial auxiliary
    • 4e. Captive financial institution or money lender
    • 4f. Insurance corporation
    • 4g. Pension fund
  • 5. Nonfinancial corporation, household or nonprofit institution serving households (NPISH)
    • 5a. Nonfinancial corporation
    • 5b. Household
    • 5c. NPISH

Public/private

  • 1. Publicly owned company
  • 2. Privately owned company

(The first category could be subdivided to distinguish among companies owned by central, state, or local governments.)

Types of Companies

  • 1. Direct investment enterprise, branch or subsidiary
  • 2. Direct investment enterprise, associate
  • 3. Direct investor
  • 4. Both a direct investment enterprise and a direct investor
  • 5. Neither a direct investment enterprise nor a direct investor

Direct investor is an entity resident in Newland that has acquired at least 10 percent of voting power of a company resident in another economy.

Direct investment enterprise is a company resident in Newland in which a foreign direct investor owns 10 percent or more of its voting power.

Immediate direct investment is when a direct investor directly owns 10 percent or more of voting power in a direct investment enterprise.

Indirect direct investment is when a direct investor owns 10 percent or more of voting power in a direct investment enterprise through a chain of ownership.

A direct investor has control over a direct investment enterprise when it owns more than 50 percent of voting power in that direct investment enterprise.

A direct investor has a significant degree of influence over a direct investment enterprise when it owns from 10 to 50 percent of voting power in that direct investment enterprise.

Industry

(This section contains whatever coding system is considered appropriate.)

In part C, the activities of the group (which are collected in the exploratory survey) are recorded. The size categories (consistent with the exploratory questionnaire) are:

  • 0 Nil
  • 1 ND1 to less than ND10,000
  • 2 ND10,000 to less than ND100,000
  • 3 ND100,000 to less than ND1 million
  • 4 ND1 million and more

Reporters are asked, on the exploratory form, to mark boxes for activities exceeding certain thresholds. The categories marked should be recorded on the line labeled categories. These data are used to identify the target populations and the sizes of population members for collection design purposes.

The categories for exports of goods and imports of goods are:

  • A Food, live animals, beverages, and tobacco
  • B Minerals, fuels, and lubricants
  • C Chemical, plastic, medical, pharmaceutical, and rubber products, and fertilizers
  • D Wood, paper, and products thereof
  • E Textiles, clothing, and footwear
  • F Machinery, office and communication equipment, and other electrical goods, including spares
  • G Vehicles and transport equipment, including spares
  • H Metal and metal products not included elsewhere
  • I All other goods

For exports of services and imports of services, the categories are:

  • A Manufacturing services on physical inputs owned by others
  • B Maintenance and repair services
  • C Passenger and freight services
  • D Operational leasing or rental without operators
  • E Other transport services
  • F Travel
  • G Construction
  • H Insurance
  • I Pension services
  • J Financial
  • K Charges for use of intellectual property
  • L Telecommunication services
  • M Computer and information services
  • N Merchanting and other trade-related services
  • O Miscellaneous business, professional, and technical services
  • P Personal, cultural, and recreational services

For external financial assets and external financial liabilities, the categories are:

  • A Positions and shares
  • B Investment fund shares and units
  • C Land
  • D Other equity
  • E Debt securities
  • F Loans
  • G Accounts receivable and payable
  • H Deposits
  • I Notes and coin
  • J Insurance and pension reserves and entitlements
  • K Financial derivatives
  • L Other

For other income and transfers, the categories are:

  • A Rent
  • B Donations
  • C Debt forgiveness
  • D Licenses to explore or exploit natural resources

In part C, an additional line is included for other activities. This is a useful place for identifying activities (which may require special targeting) such as merchanting and imports and exports of goods for processing or repair.

In part D, data are recorded on the source used to identify this unit and on the most recent exploratory survey in which this unit was included.

In part E, details of subsidiary companies and any direct investment enterprises abroad are recorded. Including the name of the immediate parent company makes it possible to identify the complete company structure when companies in the group are subsidiaries of subsidiaries.

In part F, major shareholders are identified. Reference numbers should be allocated to these major shareholders, and a separate record created for them, even if they are nonresident entities.

General Notes and Instructions for Form 3.3—ITRS—Companies

1. The international transactions reporting system (ITRS) collects data from companies via several forms. The main form is the Form 3-3—ITRS—Companies, which companies are required to complete and return to the Newland Ministry of Statistics each month. The Annex to Forms 3-1–3-5 for ITRS—Classifications contains the codes and descriptions necessary to complete Form 3-3.

2. A nonresident is an individual, company, or other organization ordinarily domiciled in an economy other than Newland. Newland branches and subsidiaries of nonresident companies are regarded as residents of Newland. Similarly, foreign branches and subsidiaries of Newland companies are regarded as nonresidents.

3. Form 3-3—ITRS—Companies collects monthly data on balance of payments transactions from companies that conduct considerable transactions with nonresidents through accounts at resident banks and/or with accounts at nonresident banks. In addition, Form 3-3 collects data on other claims on, or liabilities to, nonresidents.

4. A separate Form 3-3 should be completed for each foreign currency account that your company has at a resident bank and each account at a nonresident bank—unless other arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

5. Form 3-4 collects data on payments and receipts passing through particular bank accounts of your company. Separate entries should be recorded for each transaction of ND 5,000 or more; smaller transactions may be combined. When several transaction codes apply to a receipt or a payment or result from payments being partly offset against receipts (or vice versa), the underlying gross transactions should be recorded. (See the Annex to Forms 3-1–3-5 for ITRS—Classifications for more information on multipayment transactions.) Similarly, offset transactions (also described in the Annex) that do not result in bank account entries but otherwise affect your company’s external asset or liability positions should also be recorded. Should your company conduct offset transactions denominated in currencies (including Newland dollars) for which a Form 3.4 is not already being completed, you should record such transactions on a separate Form 3-3.

6. Form 3-3 can be used as a pro forma for supplying relevant data in computer readable format, or information may be entered on the form itself. If space to record all transactions is insufficient, please be sure to attach the additional details.

Completing Form 3.3—ITRS—Companies

Part A

7. The company reference number is listed on page 1 of this form. The currency code classification is included in the Annex to Forms 3-1–3-5 for ITRS—Classifications. Month and year should be entered as a four-digit number (e.g., 0412 for April 2012).

Part B

8. Day should be recorded as a two-digit number (e.g., 02 for the second day of the month). The number of the first transaction recorded each day should be 001; successive three-digit numbers should be used for subsequent transactions. The transaction code, the transaction type, the other party code, and the economy code should be taken from the Annex to Forms 3-1–3-5 for ITRS—Classifications.

9. To limit the reporting burden and processing costs, data should be reported in thousands or millions of currency units and small transactions should be combined. For certain types of transactions (namely, multipayment and offset transactions), it is necessary to identify the underlying transactions and report them on a gross basis (see note 5).

10. In columns G and I where values should be expressed in Newland dollars, transactions should be converted at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction.

Parts C and D

11. Parts C and D facilitate reconciliation and verification of data supplied in part B. Any significant reconciliation amounts or unusual exchange rates should be explained.

Part E

12. The asset/liability code should be selected from codes 710 through 790 for assets and 810 through 890 for liabilities from the transaction codes in the Annex to Forms 3-1–3-5 for ITRS—Classification. The economy code should be taken from the relevant listing from the Annex [to be provided by the compiler]. The currency code should be taken from the relevant listing from the Annex [to be provided by the compiler]. One line should be used for each asset/liability, economy, and currency combination. For example, if your company held a portfolio of equity securities in a nonbank company in the United States and had long-term U.S. dollar loans from banks in the United States in U.S. dollars and United Kingdom in pounds, these three entries should be made:

ABC
710001USD
850001USD
850002GBP

13. In column A, 710 represents shares in nonresident companies, and 850 represents long-term loan liabilities to nonresidents. In column B, 001 represents the United States and 002 represents the United Kingdom. In column C, USD represents the U.S. dollar and GBP represents the Great Britain pound.

14. Not all of your company’s payments to, and receipts from, nonresidents will be reported in part B as some payments may have been made through foreign exchange orders with domestic banks. These transactions should be reported on Form 3-1—ITRS—Payments and Receipts, which will be provided to you by your bank. However, for purposes of reconciliation, any effect that these payments and receipts have on the external assets and liabilities of your company must be reported in columns H and I.

Part F

15. This section of the form collects, for payments made through accounts covered by Form 3-3, information on goods imported and exported during the month and on payments made during the month. As delivery and payments may occur in different months, goods reported in columns D, E, and F may not correspond with those recorded in column G. As the value in your books may differ from the cost insurance and freight (c.i.f.) and the free on board (f.o.b.) values required for balance of payments purposes, you are requested to provide these bases of valuation, even if some degree of estimation is required. Economy of consignment is the economy from which your imports were initially dispatched. Economy of destination is the economy to which you expect to make final delivery of your exports. The relevant economy codes from the Annex should be used [to be provided by the compiler]. Please note that all amounts in foreign currencies should be converted at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction.

Part G

16. This section is included to assist you in checking the form before you return it.

Notes and Instructions for Form 3-4 and Form 3-5

1. The international transactions reporting system (ITRS) collects information from banks via a number of forms.

Definitions of Residents and Nonresidents

2. A nonresident is an individual, company, or other organization ordinarily domiciled in an economy other than Newland. Newland branches and subsidiaries of nonresident companies are regarded as residents of Newland. Similarly, foreign branches and subsidiaries of Newland companies are regarded as nonresidents.

Form 3 Series

3. The basic form is the Form 3-1—ITRS—Payments and Receipts. These should be completed by residents of Newland who make payments to, or receive payments from, nonresidents, in any currency. Supplementary Form 3-2—ITRS—Imports and Exports is required for transactions involving goods arriving in or departing from Newland. To reduce reporting burdens and processing costs associated with the Form 3 series, a number of exemptions are permitted. These include:

  • (a) Transactions in the amount less than the equivalent of ND 5,000. However, transactions below this level are the subject of small sample surveys (see note 8).
  • (b) Purchases and sales of travelers’ checks. These should be reported by your bank on Form 3-4—ITRS—Banks, part B, at the time the traveler’s checks are settled with nonresident banks.

4. In accordance with ITRS collection arrangements, your bank is responsible for making resident bank customers aware of their obligations to complete Form 3-1. In most cases, Form 3-1 should be completed when customers enter your bank to undertake the relevant transactions. (Some banks have combined the ITRS forms with bank forms on which payment instructions are specified.) Persons or companies engaging in transactions valued at the equivalent of ND 100,000 or more per year should register with the Newland Ministry of Statistics to obtain a transactor code.

5. Tracking the occurrence of payments made, in Newland dollars, by residents to nonresidents is more difficult; resident transactors may engage in such transactions without approaching a bank. When particular persons or companies regularly conduct such transactions, the Newland Ministry of Statistics will make special arrangements for resident principals to report the transactions directly to the ministry.

6. The staff of your bank should be familiar with Form 3-1 and with the Annex to Forms 3-1–3-5 for ITRS—Classifications, which is used by transactors to complete other forms. An ITRS training package is available from the Newland Ministry of Statistics, or your bank may telephone for assistance at the numbers shown on page 1 (upper right-hand corner) of this form.

7. Your bank should maintain a sufficient supply of forms and should also, if customers complete forms regularly, encourage them to maintain supplies of forms for their use. Your bank may order forms by contacting the Newland Ministry of Statistics at the address shown on page 1 of this form.

ITRS Form 3-4—Banks

8. Form 3-4 primarily collects data on payments and receipts for your bank’s own accounts with nonresidents. Separate entries should be recorded for each transaction of ND 5,000 or more; smaller transactions may be combined. When several transaction codes apply to a receipt or a payment or result from payments being partly offset against receipts (or vice versa), the underlying gross transactions should be recorded. (See Annex to Forms 3-1–3-5 for ITRS—Classifications for further information on multipayment transactions and offset transactions [to be provided by the compiler]) that do not result in bank account entries but otherwise affect the banks’ external asset and liability position should also be recorded.

9. Form 3-4 can be used as a pro forma for supplying relevant data in computer-readable form, or information may be entered on the form itself. If space to record all transactions is insufficient, please be sure to attach the additional details.

Completing ITRS Form 3-4—Banks

Part A

10. The bank reference number is listed on page 1 of this form. The currency code classification is shown in the Annex to Forms 3-1–3-5 for ITRS—Classification [to be provided by the compiler]. Month and year should be entered as a four-digit number (e.g., 0494 for April 1994).

Part B

11. The day should be recorded as a two-digit number (e.g., 02 would represent the second day of the month). Number is a three-digit code. The number 001 should be the first number used each day. Subsequent numbers should be used for subsequent transactions. The transaction code, the transaction type, the other party code, and the economy code should be taken from Form 3-1.

12. To reduce the reporting burden and limit processing costs, data should be reported in thousands or millions of currency units; and small transactions should be combined. For multipayment and offset transactions, it is necessary to identify the underlying transactions, and these should be reported on a gross basis.

13. In columns G and I where values should be expressed in Newland dollars, transactions should be converted at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction.

Part C

14. Part C facilitates checking of the conversion rates used in part B. Any unusual conversion rates should be explained.

Parts D, E, and F

15. Parts D, E, and F facilitate reconciliation of positions and flow data supplied in various forms. Data in part D represent a summary of Form 3-5, which is described subsequently. Any significant reconciliation amounts reported in column E of parts E or F should be explained. For transactions in Newland dollars, closing balances in part E, columns A and B should be recorded as zero—unless the bank holds Newland dollar accounts with nonresident banks, in which case the balance of these accounts should be recorded. See Form 3-1 for a list of economy codes.

Part G

16. The asset/liability code should be selected from codes 710 through 790 for assets and 810 through 890 for liabilities from the transaction code classification shown on Form 3-1. The economy code should be selected from the economy classifications shown in the Annex [to be provided by the compiler]. One line should be used for each asset/liability, economy, and currency combination. For example, if your company held a portfolio of equity securities in a nonbank company in the United States and had long-term U.S. dollar loans from banks in the United States in U.S. dollars and United Kingdom in pounds, these three entries should be made:

ABC
710001USD
850001USD
850002GBP

17. In column A, 710 represents shares in nonresident companies, and 850 represents long-term loan liabilities to nonresidents. In column B, 001 represents the United States and 002 represents the United Kingdom. In column C, USD represents the U.S. dollar and GBP represents the Great Britain pound.

Part H

18. This section is included to assist you in checking the form before you return it.

Other ITRS Forms

20. Your bank may encounter other special purpose ITRS collection forms requesting information on transactions that cannot readily be collected by using Forms 3-1 to 3-5.

Notes and Instructions for Form 3-5—ITRS—Bank’s Record of Transactions

In accordance with ITRS collection arrangements, your bank should, for transactions that pass through the bank, maintain a record of all transactions with nonresidents. A copy of these records should be sent to the Newland Ministry of Statistics, within six days of the end of the reference month, on Form 3-5—ITRS—Bank’s Record of Transactions. Entries in some table cells are not required (note //// marks). For example, in columns E, F, and G, only currency code, payments and receipts, and value are required. For column A (bank’s own transactions), greater detail is required on the Form 3-4—ITRS—Banks; this column is included in the table on Form 3-5 to show the coverage provided by Form 3-4. Form 3-5 can be regarded as a pro forma for supplying data in computer readable form.

Instructions for Completing Form 4—Goods

Reporting Instructions

Form 4 should be completed for the company (and any subsidiaries in Newland) listed on page 1 of the form—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

Residents and Nonresidents

A nonresident is any individual, company, or other organization domiciled in an economy other than Newland. Newland subsidiaries of nonresident companies are residents of Newland. Similarly, foreign subsidiaries of Newland companies are nonresidents.

Conversion to Newland Dollars

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Foreign currencies should be converted to Newland dollars at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction.

Structure of Form 4

Form 4 collects information on the goods transactions of this company and its Newland subsidiaries with nonresidents.

Parts A and B collect data on exports and imports—that is, goods sold to nonresidents (exports) and goods purchased from nonresidents (imports).

Part C covers repairs by nonresidents to goods owned by your company.

Parts D (exports) and E (imports) measure significant differences between date of sale and date of shipment.

Parts F (imports) and J (exports) are concerned with the financing of trade.

Completing Part A (Exports of Goods)

In column A, enter a description of the commodity exported by your company (and its subsidiaries), and in columns E to I the countries in which final delivery of the goods is expected. One row should be completed for each commodity. Please note that the sum of columns E through I should equal column D. The free on board (f.o.b.) value is the value of goods at the point of departure from the exporting economy (in this case, Newland), and the f.o.b. value includes the cost of loading the goods prior to transportation. If the response to item 6 is ND 500 or less, record a dash (—).

Completing Part B (Imports of Goods)

Record the free on board (f.o.b.) value and the cost, insurance, and freight (c.i.f.) values for each commodity group that your company (and its subsidiaries) imports. The f.o.b. value is the value of goods when they leave the exporting economy; the f.o.b. value includes also the cost of loading the goods prior to transportation. The c.i.f. value is the value of goods delivered to the border of the importing economy (in this case, Newland). If you are in doubt about the commodity group for a particular import, please contact the Newland Ministry of Statistics or describe details in the space provided on the form. The economy from which the goods were initially dispatched (consigned) should be entered in the heading for columns C through G, and the sum of the values recorded in those columns should equal column B. If the answer to question 11 or 12 is ND 500 or less, record a dash (—).

Completing Part C (Repairs to Goods)

A separate line should be completed for each commodity and economy. In column D, any associated transportation and insurance costs should be reported separately.

Completing Parts D and E (Consignment Trade)

A separate line should be completed for each commodity and economy combination. In part D, please report details about goods sent abroad on consignment, including value of goods sent abroad during the period, value of goods sold, value of goods destroyed or wasted, value of goods returned and values of goods held. Please verify that the total value of goods held at the end of the period (column D) equals the beginning value (column C) plus the value of goods sent (column E), less the value of goods sold (column G), less goods returned (column F), less goods wasted or destroyed (column H). Details of commissions paid to nonresident agents should also be reported. Similarly, in part E, please report details about goods held domestically on consignment and commissions received from nonresidents for the sale of consignment goods.

Completing Parts F and G (Trade Payables and Receivables)

A separate line should be completed for each economy. In part F, please report any advances paid on goods yet to be imported, payments made on goods imported in previous periods, and goods imported where payment was made in a previous period or is yet to be made. In part G, please report any advances received on goods yet to be exported, payments received on goods exported in previous periods, and goods exported where payment was received in a previous period or is yet to be received.

Instructions for Completing Form 6—International Trade in Services

Reporting Instructions

Form 6 should be completed for the company (and any subsidiaries in Newland) listed on page 1 of the form—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

Residents and Nonresidents

A nonresident is any individual, company, or other organization ordinarily domiciled in an economy other than Newland. Newland subsidiaries of nonresident companies are residents of Newland. Similarly, foreign subsidiaries of Newland companies are nonresidents.

Conversion to Newland Dollars

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Foreign currencies should be converted to Newland dollars at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction.

Structure of Form 6

Form 6 collects quarterly information on selected international service transactions of this company and its subsidiaries.

Parts A and B cover services (except insurance, pension, transportation, and travel services) provided to and received from nonresidents. International insurance transactions should be reported in part C, and international pension payments should be reported in part D. Details of transportation and travel transactions are collected through other survey forms. The activities of resident insurance companies and pension funds are collected through other survey forms.

Economy

Each question seeks information on the economy of transaction. Record the economy of residence of the nonresident transactor.

Services Included

Services, which are products other than tangible goods, include communications, advertising, accounting, and management consulting. Services do not include wages, profits, dividends, or interest. Transportation and travel services should not be included as information on these items is collected through other survey forms.

Servicesprovidedtononresidents include those for which payment is made directly to your company by a nonresident entity (including a foreign affiliate of your company). Record services provided by your company, its employees abroad, or some other resident entity on whose behalf your company receives payment. Exclude services that are provided to nonresidents by your company and paid for through other unrelated resident entities; however, report the names and addresses of these entities in your response to question 39.

Servicesreceivedfromnonresidents include all services provided by nonresidents and paid for directly by your company, its subsidiaries, or its employees. Exclude services that are provided by nonresidents to your company or its subsidiaries and paid for, on your behalf, by other unrelated resident entities; however, record the names and addresses of these entities in your response to question 39.

Because form 6 seeks information on transactions between residents and nonresidents, you should not report services provided to nonresidents by nonresident companies owned by your company. However, you should report services provided by your company to related companies abroad and services provided by related companies abroad to your company. If determinations between branch activities and head office activities prove difficult, or if you are uncertain about whether a particular transaction should be included, please call (XXX) XXX-XXXX for assistance.

Individual Service Categories

MaintenanceandRepairServices: These services include fees charged for the maintenance and repair and the value of any parts or material included in the repair fee. Where parts or materials are separately charged, they are excluded from the value of the service.

PostalandCourierServices: These services include the pickup, transport, and delivery of letters, newspapers, periodicals, brochures, other printed matter, parcels, and packages. They also include post office counter services, such as sales of stamps and mailbox rental services.

FinancialServices: These services include fees for intermediation services such as lending, financial leasing, letters of credit, bankers’ acceptances, lines of credit, foreign exchange transactions, and traveler’s check transactions; commissions and fees associated with security brokerage, placements of issues, underwriting, redemptions, swaps, options, and commodity futures; and portfolio and other financial management fees.

ChargesfortheUseofIntellectualProperty: These include fees associated with the use of patents, copyrights, trademarks, industrial processes, franchises, and so forth, and licensing agreements associated with manuscripts, paintings, sculptures, and so forth, as well as other outcomes of research and development. Included are also charges for licenses to reproduce and/or distribute (e.g., copyright on books and manuscripts, computer software, cinematographic work, and sound recordings and related rights, such as for recording of live performances, television, cable or satellite). However, outright purchases/sales of such marketing assets (e.g., franchises and trademarks) are recorded as transactions in assets (see Part E).

TelecommunicationsServices: These services include broadcast or transmission of sound, images, data, or other information by telephone, telex, telegram, radio and television cable transmission, radio and television satellite, electronic mail and networking, teleconferencing, and similar services.

ComputerServices: These services include data base development, storage, and online time series facilities; data processing, tabulation, processing services (on a time-share or specific basis), and processing management services; hardware consultancy; software design, development, and customized implementation and programming; maintenance and repair of computers and peripheral equipment; and computer-related online downloads.

InformationServices: This category includes news agency services, database services, and Web search portals. Also included are direct nonbulk subscriptions to newspapers and periodicals, whether by mail, electronic transmission, or other means; other online content provision services (except for software or audio, e-books, and video); and library and archive services.

ResearchandDevelopment: These activities cover those services that are associated with basic research, applied research, and experimental development of new products and processes (e.g., research associated with the physical and social sciences, humanities, etc.).

ProfessionalandManagementConsultingServices: These services include legal advice, representation, and documentation; accounting, auditing, bookkeeping, and tax-related services; planning, organization, cost projecting, and human resource management; and public relations. They also include advertising services; trade fair exhibition services; market research; and public opinion polling services.

Architecture, Engineering, andOtherTechnicalServices: These services include architectural design of urban and other development projects; planning, project design, and supervision of dams, bridges, airports, turnkey projects, and so forth; and surveying, product testing and certification, and technical inspection services.

WasteTreatmentandDepollution, Agricultural, andMiningServices: This category includes services associated with the treatment of radioactive and other waste and cleanup of pollution and spills and restoring the environment; services associated with agricultural crops—for example, protection against insects and disease, increasing of harvest yields, and so forth; forestry and fishing services; mining, oil and gas-related services—for example, analysis of ores and so forth.

OperatingLeasing: Operating leasing includes leasing of buildings, machinery and equipment—other than transportation equipment with crew—and excludes items under financial lease.

Trade-RelatedServices: These services include commissions on goods and services associated with commodity brokerage, auction sales, sales of ships and aircraft, and so forth.

OtherBusinessServices: These services include distribution services related to water, steam, gas, and other petroleum products and air-conditioning supply (where identified separately from transmission services); security and investigative services, translation and interpretation, photographic services, building cleaning, placement of personnel, real estate services, and so forth.

Personal, Cultural, andRecreationalServices: These services include fees received by actors, directors, and producers associated with the production of motion picture and television films; downloading of mass-produced audiovisual products (movies and music, including recordings of live performances); health services, education services, heritage and other cultural services, and sporting and other recreational services.

Note: Services, including education and health services, provided to nonresidents visiting Newland are considered to be travel services and should not be reported on this form.

Insurance Transactions to Be Reported in Part C

Details of insurance premiums and claims for insurance placed directly abroad by Newland residents (other than insurance companies) and by Newland insurance agents and brokers on behalf of Newland residents should be recorded. Insurance companies, unless such companies also act as brokers or agents, should not complete this part of the form. Companies that use a resident agent or broker to place insurance abroad should not report these transactions as the transactions will be reported by the broker or agent.

Pension Transactions to Be Reported in Part D

Details of pension contributions on behalf of resident employees into nonresident pension funds and on behalf of nonresident employees should be recorded.

Instructions for Completing Form 8—Resident Transport Operators

Reporting Instructions

Form 8 should be completed for the company (and any subsidiaries in Newland) listed on page 1 of the form—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

Residents and Nonresidents

A nonresident is any individual, company, or other organization domiciled in an economy other than Newland. Newland subsidiaries of nonresident companies are residents of Newland. Similarly, foreign subsidiaries of Newland companies are nonresidents.

Conversion to Newland Dollars

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Foreign currencies should be converted to Newland dollars at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction.

Structure of Form 8

Form 8 collects information on the international transportation activities of this company and its Newland subsidiaries. Part A collects selected earning and expense data. Part B collects information on expected purchases of large equipment. Part C requests selected details of ticket sales to resident travelers on international routes.

Partner Economy

Part A of form 8 requests information on earnings and expenses by economy. The countries in which earnings or expenses were incurred should be indicated. (Transactions with residents of Newland should be recorded as such in sections 2a and 2b of part A.) Part C requests information on amounts of revenue earned by other nonresident airlines on passenger ticket sales by your company. The economy of residence of the nonresident transport operator should be recorded.

Passenger Fares (Item 1)

Amounts reported should include passenger fares earned, for the categories of persons shown in the table, by your company and its subsidiaries. Earnings from the charter of transport equipment with crew (to carry passengers) and from accompanied luggage (excess baggage) should be included. Earnings should be recorded on a gross basis—that is, before any deduction of commissions on ticket sales. Such commissions should be regarded as expenses and reported in item 11.

Freight Services (Item 2)

Amounts reported should include earnings by this company and its subsidiaries from the carriage of goods (freight) and from the charter of transport equipment with crew (to carry goods). Earnings should be recorded on a gross basis—that is, before any deduction of commissions to freight agents. Such commissions should be regarded as expenses and reported in item 12.

Charter of Equipment without Crew (Items 3b and 13)

Amounts reported should cover payments associated with charter of transport equipment without crew—except for transport equipment under a financial lease.

Agent Fees on Passenger Fares (Item 11)

Amounts reported should include fees paid to nonresidents in respect of passenger fares earned.

Passenger Fare Ticket Sales to Residents (Part C)

These data are required to estimate earnings and associated expenses of nonresident operators on passenger services provided to resident travelers. In item 17, data on ticket sales (less refunds) to resident travelers for international routes should be reported. In item 18, revenue paid to nonresident operators on tickets sold by your company should be reported. All amounts should be reported before deduction of commissions on ticket sales. Commissions earned by your company on revenue reported in item 18 should be recorded in item 19 rather than item 3.

Instructions for Completing Form 9—Transactions with Nonresident Transport Operators

Reporting Instructions

Form 9 should be completed for the company (and any subsidiaries in Newland) listed on page 1 of the form—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

Residents and Nonresidents

A nonresident is any individual, company, or other organization domiciled in an economy other than Newland. Newland subsidiaries of nonresident companies are residents of Newland. Similarly, foreign subsidiaries of Newland companies are nonresidents.

Conversion to Newland Dollars

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Foreign currencies should be converted to Newland dollars at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction.

Structure of Form 9

Form 9 collects information on the transactions of this company with nonresident transport operators, including foreign airlines, ships, railways, fishing vessels, and so forth (if the company is unaffiliated with nonresident operators to whom services are provided) or on transactions of the branch offices or agencies representing the nonresident transport operators with or on behalf of its nonresident parent company.

Part A, which is divided into two subsections, collects data on goods and services provided to nonresident transport operators. In items 1 through 10, report goods and services that your company provides to nonresidents and for which your company arranges settlement directly with a nonresident transport operator or the nonresident agent thereof. Information on settlements made through other resident companies will be collected directly from them. In items 11 through 20, report goods and services that are acquired by nonresident transport operators from other residents and for which settlement is made through your company or its subsidiaries.

Part B collects data on the ticket sales on behalf of nonresident transport operators and revenue earned by nonresident transport operators. This part should be completed by branch offices or agencies representing nonresident transport operators for nonresident transport operators.

Part C collects data on selected earnings, such as those from the provision of freight services within Newland (inland freight), of nonresident transport operators and other payments to nonresident operators—apart from passenger services and freight services provided on imports and exports). This part should be completed by branch offices or agencies reprinting nonresident transport operators for nonresident transport operators.

Economy

The economy of residence of the nonresident transport operator should be recorded in several sections of form 9.

Passenger Fares (Items 21 and 22)

Item 21 requests data on the value of ticket sales (less refunds) made by nonresident transport operators to Newland resident travelers. Item 22 requests information on passenger revenue earned by nonresident transport operators from tickets sold (irrespective of which operator sold the ticket) to residents of Newland. (A ticket sold by one operator may be used on another operator’s service and thereby generate revenue for the second operator.) If your company is a branch or agent of the first operator, the ticket sale should be reported in item 21. If your company is a branch or agent of the second operator, the ticket sale should be reported in item 22. Fares should be recorded on a gross basis—that is, before deduction of commissions. Commissions paid by nonresident transport operators on ticket sales should be recorded in part A. Revenue includes earnings from the charter of transport equipment with crew (to carry passengers) and from accompanied luggage (excess baggage).

Instructions for Completing Form 10—International Travel

Reporting Instructions

Form 10 should be completed for the company (and any subsidiaries in Newland) listed on page 1 of the form—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

Residents and Nonresidents

A nonresident is any individual, company, or other organization ordinarily domiciled in an economy other than Newland. Newland subsidiaries of nonresident companies are residents of Newland. Similarly, foreign subsidiaries of Newland companies are nonresidents.

Travelers

Travelers are persons who stay, for work and other purposes (e.g., tourism, education, health), in countries other than those in which they are residents. Normally, a person staying in an economy for less than 12 months should be regarded as a traveler. Students and medical patients should, regardless of their length of stay in the host economy, be regarded as travelers. Officials of foreign governments stationed at embassies and similar institutions are not regarded as travelers.

Conversion to Newland Dollars

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Foreign currencies should be converted to Newland dollars at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction.

Structure of Form 10

Form 10 collects information on the international travel transactions of this company.

Part A should be completed by companies issuing credit and debit cards or by companies making settlements abroad for credit and debit card transactions.

Part B should be completed by companies issuing travelers’ checks and making settlements abroad for traveler’s check transactions.

Part C should be completed by tour wholesalers and companies making or receiving prepayments, advances, or travel settlements. Amounts for passenger fares for travel on international routes should be excluded.

Part D should be completed by hotels that provide lodging or other services to international travelers. Part D should include amounts received from supplementary hotel operations (such as gift shops) and amounts received from nonresident travelers and used to acquire, on behalf of these travelers, goods and services from other resident companies.

Economy

In parts A, B, and C, you are requested to classify transactions by economy of the nonresident counterparty. In part D, you should report the economy of residence of the nonresident travelers.

Credit and debit card and traveler’s checks transactions

Traveler’s checks and credit and debit card transactions should be recorded at the face value of the transaction. Any fees earned or paid abroad should be separately recorded.

Instructions for Completing Form 12—International Insurance Transactions

Reporting Instructions

Form 12 should be completed for the company (and any subsidiaries in Newland) listed on page 1 of the form—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

Residents and Nonresidents

A nonresident is any individual, company, or other organization ordinarily domiciled in an economy other than Newland.

Conversion to Newland Dollars

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Foreign currencies should be converted to Newland dollars at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction.

Structure of Form 12

Part A collects information associated with nonlife insurance contracts between your resident insurance company and nonresident policyholders; reinsurance between your resident insurance company and nonresident insurance companies; and information associated with life insurance contracts between your resident insurance company and nonresident policyholders.

The requested information refers to the following:

Direct written premiums are the amounts charged to and physically paid by the nonresident policyholders during the accounting (“risk”) period for insurance coverage.

Important: Direct written premium amounts should not be adjusted for reinsurance premiums—that is, the part of the premiums that is ceded to reinsurers should be left included; any assumed premiums from other direct insurers should be excluded. These ceded or assumed premiums should be shown separately under cross border reinsurance transactions.

Premiums earned refer to the proportion of actual premiums that relate to the accounting period (independent of whether they were paid during current or previous quarters) and that cover the risks incurred during the current accounting period.

Paid claims/benefits occur when actual payments of cash have been made to nonresident claimants for insured events of the current or previous periods.

Claims/benefits due/outstanding are claims that became due, in the current quarter, after the eventualities that gave rise to the claims—that is, the cost of claims is assigned to the relevant period. It should include claims that have been reported but not yet settled, and claims that have been reported and settled but not yet paid at the end of the accounting period.

Claims due on extraordinary events are claims on catastrophic events including earthquakes, tsunami, floods, cyclones, hurricanes, hail storms, bush fires, and so forth, where these events are not periodic and not considered part of normal business.

Ceding commission is paid by the reinsurer to reimburse the ceding company for its acquisition expenses and other costs incurred to place the business with the reinsurer.

Profit commission represents a predetermined percentage of the profit realized by the reinsurer on the contracts ceded by the primary insurance companies and the cedants’ share of such profits.

Income earned refers to income from the investment of reserves held against unearned premiums and unpaid claims (i.e., from investing policyholders’ funds) during the period.

Part B collects data on technical reserves due to nonresidents by type of insurance.

Insurance technical reserves include details of premiums paid and not yet earned and claims due but not yet paid. These amounts refer to reserves set aside on the balance sheet for future commitments that arise out of nonlife insurance contracts (including any related administration expenses, taxes, etc.).

  • a. Unearned premium reserves are that part of premiums written that apply to the unexpired part of the policy period. Please provide the position of unearned premium reserves vis-à-vis nonresident policyholders at the beginning and at the end of the accounting period.
  • b. Please provide the position of estimated reserves for claims incurred vis-à-vis nonresident policyholders but not reported and provisions set aside to meet the estimated costs of settling claims that have occurred up to the end of the accounting period from policies currently in force and policies written in the past, after the deduction of amounts already paid. This amount would include funds for unpaid claims, claims adjustment and handling expenses known but not yet settled, and estimates for claims incurred but not yet notified (so called IBNR, Incurred But Not Reported) by the balance sheet date.
  • c. Insurance technical reserves for life insurances comprise reserves for unearned premiums and against outstanding insurance claims, and, in addition, actuarial reserves for life insurance and with-profit insurance set aside for payments of benefits in future.
  • d. Additional information:Changes in life insurance actuarial reserves vis-à-vis nonresident policyholders refers to the changes in the present value of the future expected cash flows of an insurance policy.

Part B collects information on payments for insurance services settled through other resident companies (if any).

Economy

Each question seeks information on the economy of transaction. Record the economy of residence of the nonresident transactor.

Instructions for Completing Form 13—International Pension Services

Reporting Instructions

Form 13 should be completed for the company (and any subsidiaries in Newland) or government entity listed on page 1 of the form—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

Residents and Nonresidents

A nonresident is any individual ordinarily domiciled in an economy other than Newland.

Conversion to Newland Dollars

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Foreign currencies should be converted to Newland dollars at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction.

Structure of Form 13

Form 13 collects quarterly information on selected international pension fund transactions and positions of this company or government entity.

Part A collects quarterly and/or annual information associated with pension contributions and benefits between the resident pension fund and nonresident individuals. Information is also requested pertaining to contributions received from domestic companies on behalf of their nonresident employees (e.g., short-term nonresident employees or employees working long-term abroad on behalf of the company).

The requested information refers to the following:

Part A: Cross border transactions and positions regarding defined contribution schemes

Actual contributions paid into individual accounts of nonresident beneficiaries include (domestic or nonresident) companies’ (i.e., employers’) contributions paid on behalf of their employees, and contributions received directly from nonresident employees/beneficiaries during the accounting period.

Benefits paid refer to actual payments made in the accounting period to nonresident retirees.

Please provide the pension entitlements in defined contribution schemes vis-à-vis nonresident beneficiaries at the beginning and at the end of the accounting period. Factors that trigger changes in pension entitlements in the current accounting period are contributions receivable for nonresident employees/beneficiaries, benefits payable to current retirees abroad, and any holding gains and losses arising from the investment of the cumulated pension entitlements vis-à-vis nonresidents that contribute to the current market value of the pension fund’s assets.

Income earned on cumulated pension entitlements attributable to nonresidents refers to actual income (i.e., interest, dividends, rents) earned on the plan assets attributable to nonresident beneficiaries during the accounting period.

Part B: Cross border transactions and positions regarding defined benefit schemes

Actual contributions paid into individual accounts of nonresident beneficiaries include (domestic or nonresident) companies’ (i.e., employers’) contributions paid on behalf of their employees, and contributions received directly from nonresident employees/beneficiaries during the accounting period.

Benefits paid refer to actual payments made in the accounting period to nonresident retirees.

Please provide the Projected Benefit Obligations (PBO) attributable to nonresident employees/beneficiaries at the beginning and the end of the accounting period. Factors that trigger changes in pension entitlements vis-à-vis nonresident employees/ beneficiaries during the accounting period are service costs, interest costs, actuarial gains/losses, contributions to the defined benefit scheme, and payments of benefits.

Please provide information regarding the increase of the PBO in the accounting period due to service costs for nonresident employees/beneficiaries—that is, the additional liability the nonresident employees/beneficiaries earned during the previous accounting period.

Please provide information regarding the increase of the PBO in the accounting period due to interest costs for nonresident employees/beneficiaries—that is, the additional liability created during the accounting period because nonresident employees are X amount of time (e.g., one year) closer to retirement.

Please provide information regarding the increase/decrease of the PBO in the accounting period due to actuarial gains and losses from the difference between expected estimates and actual values in nonresident employees’/beneficiaries’ pension plan.

Economy

Each question seeks information on economy of transaction. Record the economy of residence of the nonresident transactor. If this is not feasible, please provide aggregate information.

Other

Because form 12 seeks information on pension transactions between residents and nonresidents, you should not report transactions provided to nonresidents by nonresident branches and subsidiaries of your company. If distinguishing between activities of the head office and nonresident branches and subsidiaries of your company proves difficult, or if you are uncertain about whether a particular transaction should be included, please call (XXX) XXX-XXX for assistance.

Pension contributions made by companies on behalf of their employees are treated as if the contributions are made by the employees themselves.

Instructions for Completing Form 15—Private Aid and Charitable Organizations

Reporting Instructions

Form 15 should be completed for the organization listed on page 1 of the form—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

Residents and Nonresidents

A nonresident is any individual, company, or other organization ordinarily domiciled in an economy other than Newland. Newland branches and subsidiaries of nonresident companies are residents of Newland. Similarly, foreign branches and subsidiaries of Newland companies are nonresidents. Foreign aid and charitable organizations associated with resident aid and charitable organizations are nonresidents.

Conversion to Newland Dollars

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Foreign currencies should be converted to Newland dollars at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction.

Structure of Form 15

Form 15 collects quarterly information on selected foreign activities and relationships of this organization and its related resident operations.

Part A collects information on related foreign operations of this organization and the funding between this company and the related foreign operations.

Part B collects information on the nonresidents who work for this organization in Newland and abroad.

Part C collects information on the foreign sources of income for this organization.

Part D collects information on the grants and disbursements made by this organization abroad.

Economy

Each question seeks information on the economy of transaction. Record the economy of residence of the nonresident transactor.

Instructions for Completing Form 16—Current Transfers, Grants, and Technical Assistance

Reporting Instructions

Form 16 should be completed by government entities, nongovernmental organizations (NGO), international or local donor entities respectively, as listed on page 1 of the form—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

Residents and Nonresidents

A nonresident is any individual, company, or other organization ordinarily domiciled in an economy other than Newland. Newland local NGOs are residents of Newland. International donor agencies or international organizations are considered nonresidents of Newland.

Conversion to Newland Dollars

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Please convert amounts in foreign currencies to Newland dollars. All amounts for transactions should be converted at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction.

Structure and Scope of Form 16

Form 16 sets out information that should be reported quarterly/annually on transfers from nonresidents, in cash or in kind, received by the Newland government entities or by the private sector (including local companies and NGOs).

Furthermore, information is collected on foreign sponsored technical assistance in form of staffed missions sent to Newland for project work. The total costs for such projects and all individual components are relevant for Newland’s balance of payments. The cost components include administrative expenses incurred in the nonresident donor economy, costs incurred in Newland (e.g., for transport, administrative arrangements), and the salaries paid to short-term expatriates as well as long-term personnel and local staff. A rough breakdown of the main technical assistance services provided to Newland (e.g., consulting, accounting, administration, management training, trade-related services) is appreciated.

If the reporter is the government entity, the report should include transfers in cash and in kind, and technical assistance received directly by the Government or provided to private sector under the Government’s monitoring.

If the reporter is a private entity (including NGOs), the report should include transfers in cash and in kind received directly by the private entity.

In part A, you should report details on received transfers in cash and in kind..

In part B, you should report details on received technical assistance in form of project work/staffed missions.

If you are unsure what should actually be reported, please call (XXX) XXX-XXXX.

Economy codes

[An economy code list should be supplied by the compiler.]

Instructions for Completing Form 17—Financial Claims on and Liabilities to Nonresidents

Reporting Instructions

Form 17 should be completed for the company (and any subsidiaries in Newland) listed on page 1 of the form—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

Residents and Nonresidents

A nonresident is any individual, company, or other organization ordinarily domiciled in an economy other than Newland. Newland branches and subsidiaries of nonresident companies are residents of Newland. Similarly, foreign branches and subsidiaries of Newland companies are nonresidents.

Yourforeigndirectinvestmententerprises are:

  • nonresident companies in which your company or its subsidiaries in Newland have voting equity of more than 50 percent; these are branches and subsidiaries, controlled by your company;
  • nonresident companies in which your company or its Newland subsidiaries have voting equity of between 10 and 50 percent: these are associates, significantly influenced by your company;
  • nonresident subsidiaries or associates of the immediate direct investment enterprises of your company, in a chain of control or influence.

A nonresidentdirectinvestor is a nonresident entity (or group of related nonresidents) that owns voting equity of 10 percent or more in this company. Nonresident companies that control or significantly influence the immediate nonresident direct investor are also considered nonresident direct investors in your company, in a chain of control or influence. Common examples of nonresident direct investors are foreign head offices (for branches) and foreign parent companies (for subsidiaries). An company may have more than one direct investor, and these direct investors may reside in different countries. An investor need not have the largest shareholding to be considered a direct investor.

Fellowenterprises are nonresident companies that are under the control or influence of the same immediate or indirect investor, but neither controls or influences the other (that is to say fellows have less than 10 percent (if any) equity ownership in each other).

Othernonresidents are those that are not direct investors, direct investment enterprises, or fellow enterprises.

The definitions and treatments of direct investment are complex. If you are uncertain about the application of definitions, please call (XXX) XXX-XXXX or e-mail bop@stat.com for assistance.

Structure of Form 17

Form 17 collects quarterly information regarding the financial claims of your company and its subsidiaries on nonresidents and the liabilities of your company and its subsidiaries to nonresidents. The form requests data on positions (stocks), financial transactions, reconciliation items (other changes in stocks), income, and associated financial fees and withholding taxes.

Form 17 consists of ten parts. Part A collects basic data on financial assets; part B collects information on financial assets classified by economy of the nonresident debtor. Parts C and D collect similar data for liabilities. Part E collects information on financial fees and withholding taxes; part F collects information on the valuation of direct investment; and parts G and H collect information on retained earnings and profits. Part I requests details on significant revisions to data for previous periods (if any), and part J includes questions for verifying the comprehensiveness of the completed data.

Financial Instruments

Equity and investment fund shares include stocks (shares) and other equity, such as investment in branches. Nonvoting preferred stock (preference shares) should be recorded under long-term debt securities.

Long-term and short-term debt securities include bonds, debentures, commercial paper, promissory notes, certificates of deposit, and other tradable nonequity securities other than financial derivatives. Long-term debt securities include instruments issued with original maturities of more than 12 months. Instruments with original maturities of 12 or fewer months are included in short-term debt securities. In parts A and C, long-term and short-term debt securities should be included in the respective category.

Financial derivatives (other than reserves) and employee stock options include all tradable financial derivatives or secondary market instruments such as options, futures, and forward contracts.

Loans include loans and financial leases. Long-term loans are those with original maturities of more than 12 months.

Deposits include checking accounts, savings accounts, and other time deposits.

Trade credit and advances are commercial credits extended by exporters to importers and prepayments made by importers to exporters.

Other includes all other financial assets and liabilities, not included in any of the specified instruments.

Positions, Transactions, Other Changes, and Income

Opening position refers to the value of the claims (part A and B) and liabilities (part C and D) of your company and its subsidiaries at the beginning of the quarter. The opening positions you report should agree with the closing positions you reported for the previous quarter. If this is not the case, details should be given in part I. The closing position refers to the value of the claims and liabilities of your company and its subsidiaries at the end of the quarter.

Financial transactions are transactions relating to the acquisition or disposal of your company’s financial claims on, or liabilities to, nonresidents. Purchases of stock made by your company (and its subsidiaries) in nonresident companies, purchases of your company’s shares by nonresidents, issuances and purchases of long- and short-term debt securities, increased deposits in bank accounts, and drawdowns of loans are examples of transactions that increase assets or liabilities. Sales of stock by your company (and its subsidiaries) in nonresident companies, sales of your company’s shares by nonresidents, redemptions and sales of long- and short-term debt securities, withdrawals from bank accounts, and repayments of loans are examples of transactions that decrease assets or liabilities.

Income refers to: (1) income receivable by your company from its ownership of claims on nonresidents; and (2) income payable by your company as a result of its liabilities to nonresidents. Common forms of income are dividends, distributions of profit, and interest.

Dividends and distributions of profit refer to income received from the ownership of stock (shares) or equivalent equity interest in companies. These amounts should be recorded on the basis of dividend (or remittance) payments dates. Interest relates to income earned from the ownership of financial assets other than equity assets. Income includes discounts. A discount is the difference between the value of a financial instrument when it issued and its final redemption value. Interest should be recorded on an accrual basis. The difference between income accrued and income payable should be recorded as a financial transaction in the instrument to which the interest relates.

For direct investments (see definition provided previously), undistributed income (reinvested earnings) should be reported in parts G and H. (See the subsequent instruction for completing these parts.)

Valuation

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Please convert amounts expressed in foreign currencies to Newland dollars.

Financial transactions and income denominated in foreign currencies should be converted to Newland dollars by using the midpoint of the appropriate buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction. Financial transactions and income should be recorded on a gross basis—that is, before the deduction of commissions on receipts (or addition of commissions on payments), brokerage fees, and withholding taxes, which are to be recorded in part E if paid to or received from a nonresident.

Positions denominated in foreign currencies should be converted to Newland dollars at the midpoint of the appropriate buy and sell exchange rates applicable on the reference dates.

All valuations should be made at marketvalues. For valuing equity positions at market value, one of the following methods may be used:

  • the midpoint of the stock market buy and sell rates on the reference date
  • a recent transaction value
  • own funds at book value
  • directors’ value
  • net asset value

Net asset value equals total assets, including intangibles, less liabilities and the paid-up value of nonvoting stock. Assets and liabilities should be recorded at current, rather than historical, values. Own funds at book value (OFBV) involves valuing a company using book values that contain major attributes of International Accounting Standards (inclusion of cumulative reinvested earnings; revaluation of most financial instruments in current period prices; and inclusion of cumulative depreciation of plant and equipment, including write-offs of worthless assets).

Relationships between Data Items

Information reported in parts A and C should reflect the following relationships:

closing position= opening position + change in position
change in position= net financial transactions + other changes
net financial transactions= increases (transactions relating to the acquisition of assets or liabilities) – decreases (transactions relating to the disposal of assets or liabilities)
other changes= valuation changes (caused by exchange rate changes, and market price changes) + residuals (caused by reclassification of items, write-downs, and arithmetical errors)

Amounts reported in parts B and D should be consistent with relevant amounts in parts A and C, respectively.

Liabilities Held by Resident Nominees and Other Financial Intermediaries on Behalf of Nonresidents

Certain liabilities (such as securities issued in Newland) of your company may be held by nonresidents through financial intermediaries in Newland, and the details of these liabilities may not be known to you. Information on these liabilities is collected by the Ministry of Statistics from the financial intermediaries.

Treatment of Transactions with Related Banks

All financial transactions involving debt or financial derivatives and positions with related banks should be included as claims on, or liabilities to, other nonresidents rather than as claims on, or liabilities to, direct investors or direct investment enterprises.

Treatment of Hedges

Financial instruments that are hedged by the use of derivatives (such as currency swaps) should be recorded according to the terms of the contract and without regard to the hedge. The details of the hedge, if it is with a nonresident, should be reported under the financial derivative instrument. For example, for a long-term loan that is the subject of a swap, information on the unhedged position, principal repayments, and interest should be recorded in the appropriate columns for long-term loans. The market value of the swap and the actual payments on the swap agreement (excluding underlying instrument) should be recorded under the appropriate position and transaction columns in the row for financial derivatives (other than reserves) and employee stock options.

Economy Classification

Economy refers to the economy of residence of the creditor or debtor. In parts B and C, if the opening and closing positions for particular countries are less than ND1 million, the amounts relating to these countries may be consolidated and attributed to the largest economy.

Transactions with international institutions, such as the Asian Development Bank, should be recorded as INT.

Retained Earnings (Parts G and H)

Parts G and H seek information on retained earnings. Part G should be completed for the foreign direct investment enterprises of your company (and its subsidiaries), and part H should be completed in respect of your company. Part H should be completed only if your company has nonresident direct investors.

Operating profit is profit from the operations of companies. When operating profit is calculated, depreciation should be determined on the basis of replacement cost. Exchange rate gains and losses, special tax provisions (such as accelerated depreciation), and any extraordinary items should be excluded from the calculation.

Net income received equals interest, dividends, and any undistributed profits from the ownership of subsidiaries and associates attributable to the company(s) concerned, less interest payable by the company(s).

Taxes on profits should be recorded when due and without penalty.

Instructions for Completing Form 18—Foreign Direct Investment

Reporting Instructions

Form 18 should be completed for the company listed on page 1 of the form—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics. Please take time to review the survey questionnaire before completing it. Do not hesitate to call (XXX) XXX-XXXX if you have any difficulty understanding or completing the survey.

Conversion to Newland Dollars

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Please convert amounts in foreign currencies to Newland dollars. All amounts for financial transactions, dividends, interests, and withholding taxes should be converted at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction; all amounts for opening and closing positions should be reported at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the reference dates.

Structure and Scope

Form 18 collects information about Newland’s direct investment that should be reported quarterly/annually including following issues:

  • Part A: General information on your company
  • Part B: Investments between your company and your foreign direct investors (i.e., foreign companies that own 10 percent or more of the voting equity in your company) and investments with nonresident fellow enterprises (i.e., selected investments with foreign companies that have your same direct investors but less than 10 percent equity ownership (if any) in each other).
  • Part C: Investment between your company and your foreign direct investment enterprises (i.e., nonresident companies in which your company directly or indirectly holds 10 percent or more of the voting equity) and investment with nonresident fellow enterprises (i.e., investment with foreign companies that are owned by your same owner).
  • Part D: Income, financial transactions, and assets and liabilities positions between your company and your foreign direct investor(s) (i.e., the foreign company(s) that owns (own) 10 percent or more of the voting equity in your company) and with nonresident fellow enterprises (i.e., investments with foreign companies that have the same owner as your company).
  • Part E: Income, financial transactions, and assets and liabilities positions between your company and foreign company(s) abroad in which your company owns 10 percent or more of the voting equity, and with nonresident fellow enterprises (i.e., investments with foreign companies that have the same owner as your company).
  • Part F: Information on positions in financial assets and liabilities between your company and nonresidents (International Investment Positions)

If audited data are not available, unaudited estimates are acceptable.

Definitions of entities in the questionnaire:

Direct investor:

A direct investor is a company, resident in an economy that directly or indirectly holds 10 percent or more of the equity in a nonresident direct investment enterprise.

Units are viewed as residents of Newland if they have resided (or intend to reside) for a year or more in Newland. A direct investor’s local enterprise group includes the resident company that directly owns a foreign direct investment enterprise (see below for definition), the resident companies that directly or indirectly control this company, and the resident companies that any of these companies directly or indirectly control in their own economy.

Direct investment enterprise:

A direct investment enterprise is a company, resident in one economy, in which a company, resident in another economy, holds 10 percent or more of the equity, either directly or indirectly.

Units are viewed as residents of Newland if they have resided (or intend to reside) for a year or more in Newland. A direct investment enterprise’s local enterprise group includes the resident company that is at least 10 percent directly owned by a foreign direct investor (see above for definition), and the resident companies that it directly or indirectly controls in its own economy.

All of these companies should be included in direct investment whether you report data for them on a single report for the local enterprise group or you report data on separate reports.

Units are viewed as nonresidents of Newland if they have resided (or intend to reside) abroad for a year or more. If you are not sure of the residence of a company, please contact us so that we may determine its status.

A fellow enterprise is a nonresident that has a common (immediate or indirect) parent with your company but neither your company nor the fellow enterprises hold 10 percent or more of the equity in the other.

An unrelated company is one that does not meet the above criteria.

Valuation of data reported in Parts B–E:

Please provide all data in thousands of Newland dollars and according to the following guidelines:

Positions

Currency:

Report all data in thousands of Newland dollars. If the currency(ies) of denomination of any of your company’s foreign assets and liabilities is (are) not in Newland dollars, please use the end-of-year foreign currency exchange rates to convert to Newland dollars.

Owners’equity:

Please report owners’ equity (i.e., net worth) as the claims on your foreign direct investment enterprise’s, or fellow enterprise’s, net worth consisting of:

  • (1) paid-up capital (excluding any shares on issue that the company holds in itself and including share premium accounts) or equivalent for unincorporated companies
  • (2) all types of reserves identified as equity in the company’s balance sheet (including investment grants when accounting guidelines consider them a component of owners’ equity)
  • (3) cumulated retained earnings (which may be negative)
  • (4) holding gains and losses

Similarly, please include the above three items in calculating the value of reverse equity investment—that is, of your direct investment enterprise’s, or of your fellow enterprise’s, claim on your own net worth.

In determining your net worth (and therefore in determining your foreign direct investor’s or fellow company’s claims on your net worth), most financial assets should be reflected at an estimate of their current fair values; cumulative reinvested earnings should be included; and depreciation on items of property, plant, and equipment should be deducted. If your normal bookkeeping or accounting rules do not value these items as described above, please adjust their values before calculating the amounts to enter in Sections B–E.

Debtinstruments:

Loans, trade credit and other accounts payable

Please report on a nominal value basis (after allowing for any changes that may result from changes in exchange rates).

Nominal value represents the value of funds advanced less any repayments plus any outstanding accrued interest.

Debtsecurities

Please report the market value of the securities, as of the balance sheet date.

Transactions

Transactions should be recorded at the value at the time of the transaction. If the transaction is in a foreign currency, please use the rate of exchange on the day of the transaction, or a weighted average rate for the reporting period if transactions (such as interest receipts and payments) occur continually over the period.

For interest, please report the total value of interest (payable and receivable) that accrued during 20XX, even if some payment were made during the year.

For dividends, please record the total value of dividends received and receivable (and paid and payable) during 20XX.

Loans: Loans are financial assets that (1) are created when a creditor lends funds directly to a debtor, and (2) are evidenced by documents that are not negotiable.

Insurance, pension, and standardized guarantee schemes: Insurance, pension, and standardized guarantee schemes comprise:

  • (1) Nonlife insurance technical reserves
  • (2) Life insurance and annuity entitlements
  • (3) Pension entitlements, claims of pension funds on sponsors, and entitlements to nonpension funds
  • (4) Provisions for calls under standardized guarantees

Trade credit and advances: trade credit and advances comprises (1) credit extended directly by the suppliers of goods and services to their customers and (2) advances for work that is in progress (or is yet to be undertaken) and prepayment by customers for goods and services not yet provided.

Other accounts receivable/payable: Other accounts receivable/payable include accounts receivable or payable other than those included in trade credit and advances or other instruments.

A financial derivative contract: A financial derivative contract is a financial instrument that is linked to another specific financial instrument or indicator or commodity and through which specific financial risks (such as interest rate risk, foreign exchange risk, equity and commodity price risks, credit risk, etc.) can be traded in their own right in financial markets.

Employee stock options: Employee stock options are options to buy the equity of a company, offered to employees of the company as a form of remuneration.

Valuation of data to be reported in Part F:

Please report data according to the following guidelines:

Currency:

Report all data in [thousands of units of domestic currency]. If the currency(ies) of denomination of any of your company’s foreign assets and liabilities is (are) not in [domestic currency], please use the end-of-year foreign currency exchange rates to convert to [domestic currency].

Owners’ equity:

For (related and unrelated) listed entities: Market value, if available; otherwise, a proxy for market value (such as net asset value)

For (related and unrelated) unlisted companies, please report the value of outstanding owners’ equity (i.e., net worth) as at year-end on the following basis.

For related entities: The sum of your foreign direct investor’s or fellow enterprise’s (see below for definitions) claims on your net worth, consisting of:

  • (1) Paid-up capital (excluding any shares on issue that the company holds in itself and including share premium accounts) or equivalent for unincorporated companies
  • (2) All types of reserves identified as equity in the company’s balance sheet (including investment grants when accounting guidelines consider them a component of owners’ equity)
  • (3) Cumulated retained earnings (which may be negative)

Similarly, please include the above three items in calculating the value of your company’s equity claim on your direct investor, direct investment enterprise, or fellow enterprise (see below for definition). Do not use the carrying value on your books.

In determining your company’s net worth, most financial assets should be reflected at an estimate of their current fair values; cumulative reinvested earnings should be included; and depreciation on items of property, plant, and equipment should be included. If your normal bookkeeping or accounting rules do not value these items as described above, please adjust their values before calculating the amounts to enter in Section F.

Debt instruments:

Loansandtradecreditandotheraccountspayable

Please report on a nominal value basis (after allowing for any changes that may result from changes in exchange rates). Nominal value represents the value of funds advanced less any repayments plus any outstanding accrued interest.

Debtsecurities

Instructions for Completing Form 19—International Securities

Reporting Instructions

Form 19 should be completed for the company (and any subsidiaries in Newland) listed on page 1 of the form—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

Residents and Nonresidents

A nonresident is any individual, company, or other organization ordinarily domiciled in an economy other than Newland. Newland subsidiaries of nonresident companies are residents of Newland. Similarly, foreign subsidiaries of Newland companies are nonresidents.

Conversion to Newland Dollars

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Please convert amounts in foreign currencies to Newland dollars. All amounts for financial transactions, income, fees, and withholding taxes should be converted at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction; all amounts for opening and closing positions should be reported at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the reference dates.

Structure and Scope of Form 19

Form 19 sets out information that should be reported quarterly by this company in respect of international security transactions undertaken on its own account or on behalf of clients. As arranged with your company, information in respect of parts A and B should be submitted by electronic means and accompanied by completed parts C through E of form 19.

In part A, you should report details on securities issued in Newland (a) by residents and held or traded by your company on behalf of nonresident clients and (b) by nonresidents and held or traded by your company on behalf of resident clients or on your own account.

In part B, you should report details on securities issued abroad (a) by residents and held or traded by your company on behalf of nonresident clients; (b) by nonresidents and held or traded by your company on behalf of resident clients or on your own account, and (c) by residents and held or traded by your company on behalf of resident clients or on your own account. For all categories, separate details should be reported for each unique security reference number (column A) and owner code (column B) combination. If you are unsure what should actually be reported, please call (XXX) XXX- XXXX.

In part C, you should report details of your company’s claims on, or liabilities to, nonresident clients in respect of accounts outstanding for security transactions, income, fees, and so forth.

Security Reference Numbers and Owner Codes

A standard security reference number should be used for each security. When such numbers do not exist—particularly for securities issued abroad—you should create your own codes and provide a list of these codes to the Newland Ministry of Statistics. The list should show, for each code, the type of security, the economy of issue, the currency of denomination, the industry (activity) of the issuer, and the sector (international institution, government, central bank, other bank, other) of the issuer. (International institutions are organizations, such as Asian Development Bank and the European Investment Bank, whose members are governments.)

The nonresident owner code should consist of four digits. The first digit of the code should describe the sector of the nonresident client (1-international institution, 2-government, 3-central bank, 4-other bank, and 5-other). The last three characters should be the economy of residence code of the nonresident client. Economy codes are provided at the conclusion of these instructions.

The resident owner code should be a four-digit alphanumeric code that is determined by your organization. A separate code should be allocated to each company (business) client. A list of these codes, showing the industry (activity) and sector (government, central bank, other bank, other financial institution, and other) of each owner should be provided to the Newland Ministry of Statistics. Clients who are individuals rather than companies should be assigned the code HOUS.

Positions, Transactions, Other Changes, Income, Fees, and Withholding Taxes

The information reported in parts A, B, and C should have the following relationships:

Closing Position = Opening Position + Financial Transactions + Other Changes.

Opening and closing positions should be reported via marketprices prevailing at the reference dates.

Financial transactions are transactions relating to the acquisition (including issues) or disposal (including redemptions) of a security. Financial transactions should be recorded before the deduction of fees.

Other changes are valuation changes, such as those caused by exchange rates (in the case of securities denominated in foreign currencies) and market price changes.

Income refers to dividends and interest. Dividends should be recorded on the ex-dividend date. Interest includes discounts. A discount is the difference between the value of a financial instrument when it is issued and its final redemption value. Interest should be recorded on an accrual basis. The difference between income accrued and income payable should be recorded as a financial transaction in the instrument to which the interest relates. If you are unsure how to record these types of transactions, please call (XXX) XXX- XXXX.

Income should be recorded before the deduction of any fees and withholding taxes.

Fees are amounts payable by nonresident clients for services provided by your company.

Withholding Taxes refer to—in the case of securities issued by residents—taxes payable to the Newland government by your company on behalf of nonresident clients and—in the case of securities issued by nonresidents—taxes withheld by foreign governments on securities held by your company on behalf of resident clients or on your own account.

Economy Codes

[An economy code list should be supplied by the compiler.]

Instructions for Completing Form 20—Holdings of and Transactions in Financial Derivatives Contracts with Nonresidents

Reporting Instructions

Form 20 should be completed for all resident companies (and any subsidiaries in Newland) that have derivative contracts with nonresidents—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

Residents and Nonresidents

A nonresident is any individual, company, or other organization ordinarily domiciled in an economy other than Newland. Newland branches and subsidiaries of nonresident companies are residents of Newland. Similarly, foreign branches and subsidiaries of Newland companies are nonresidents. Transactions and positions should be reported for the economy in which the direct counterparty resides. Please do not report transactions and positions based on currency of denomination of the instrument, the economy of the parent institution of the counterparty (i.e., nationality), the economy of issuance of the instrument, or the economy of a guarantor (i.e., ultimate risk).

Conversion to Newland Dollars

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Please convert amounts in foreign currencies to Newland dollars. All amounts for financial transactions, income, fees, and withholding taxes should be converted at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction; all amounts for opening and closing positions should be reported at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the reference dates.

Reporting of Positions

In Parts A, B and C, positions reported should be the balances outstanding at the close of business as of the last day of the calendar quarter covered by the report. Financial derivatives are valued at market prices prevailing on the balance sheet recording dates. If market price data are unavailable, other fair value methods (such as option models or present values) may be used to value them. Positions data should be reported on a gross basis. However, multiple contracts with a single counterparty may be reported on a net basis if a master netting agreement is in place and if the contracts are carried out at net values in the reporting company’s accounting records and statements of financial position.

Structure and Scope of Form 20

The purpose of this form is to gather timely and reliable information on transactions in, and holdings of, derivatives contracts with foreign residents, categorized by the economy of the foreign resident. The data are collected according to the derivative instruments: options, futures and forwards, and swaps. The value of commodities, securities, other noncash and cash (for foreign exchange currency swaps) assets received or delivered to settle derivatives contracts of any type should not be included in the reporting of transactions and positions. Employee stock options (financial instruments that may have similar characteristics as call options) should not be included in the reporting of transactions and positions.

Part A—Options: For transactions (columns B and C), report premiums paid or received on options. In columns D and E, report the receipts or payments of cash upon exercise of options that are settled only in cash. End-quarter positions are to be reported in columns F (Assets) and G (Liabilities).

Part B—Futures Transactions and Forward Agreements: For transactions in futures and forwards (columns B and C), report the cumulative payments or receipts (usually daily for futures) that arise from the change in value of the futures contracts (the “variation margin”). Also include the final cash settlement of futures and forwards contracts. For forward rate agreements, report cash received or paid upon maturity or settlement of forward agreements (including foreign exchange contracts). Do not report the amount received or paid upon settlement of a forward with a security or other noncash asset. End-quarter positions are to be reported in columns D (Assets) and E (Liabilities).

Part C—Swaps: Report in columns B and C the net amount of cash received or paid upon maturity or termination of a swap; and any periodic net cash settlement payments required under the terms of the swap (net settlements refer to the netting of individual contract flows and not to the netting of like instruments). End-quarter positions are to be reported in columns D (Assets) and E (Liabilities).

Part D—Notional Value of Foreign-Currency and Foreign Currency-Linked Contracts: Report positions in notional value, classified by foreign current payments and receipts, and by instrument (forwards and options).

Specific Exclusions:

The following should not be reported: (1) spot foreign exchange contracts, (2) short sale of assets, (3) regular securities trades, (4) normal purchases and sales of an item other than a financial instrument or derivative instrument that will be delivered in quantities expected to be used or sold by the reporting entity over a reasonable period in the normal course of business, (5) life insurance, property and casualty contracts, and (6) financial guarantees that do not meet the definition of a derivative. For further information on financial arrangements that are not financial derivatives, see the sixth edition of the Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual (paragraph 5.83).

Instructions for Completing Form 23—International Transactions and Positions of Households

Reporting Instructions

Form 23 should be completed for the household listed on page 1 of the form—unless different arrangements have been made with the Newland Ministry of Statistics.

Residents and Nonresidents

A nonresident is any individual, company, or other organization ordinarily domiciled in an economy other than Newland. Newland subsidiaries of nonresident companies are residents of Newland. Similarly, foreign subsidiaries of Newland companies are nonresidents.

Conversion to Newland Dollars

All values should be reported in thousands of Newland dollars. Foreign currencies should be converted to Newland dollars at the midpoint of the buy and sell rates applicable on the date of the transaction. Where amounts are less than ND500, leave blank or indicate with a “—”.

Structure of Form 23

Form 23 collects quarterly information on selected international positions and transactions of this household.

Part A collects information on goods received and sent by parcel post and courier services. Do not include goods purchased abroad and sent home during the personal trip.

Part B collects information on services received from nonresidents. Legal services include conveyancing on property purchases. Education services include correspondence courses and education services purchased online. Entertainment services include purchases of online content, fee-for-use Websites, and pay-per-view television. Do not include services purchased abroad during the personal trip.

Part C collects information on foreign assets, including participation in time-share arrangements on foreign property and holdings of foreign-issued notes and coin. Equity and units in investment funds exclude positions held on your behalf by resident custodians and fund managers. Other changes include changes in the value of assets due to market price changes and exchange rate changes.

Part D collects information on foreign income received.

Part E collects information on foreign liabilities. Mortgages with foreign banks (e.g., on foreign properties) should be included with loans.

Part F collects information on payments made to nonresidents.

Economy

Each question seeks information on the economy of transaction or position. Record the economy of residence of the nonresident transactor.

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